Welcome

The Centre for Social Research in Health (CSRH) will host the 14th Social Research Conference on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Related Diseases (HHARD) at UNSW Australia on Thursday March 31 and Friday April 1, 2016. The HHARD Conference is integral to Australia's efforts in understanding the social and behavioural dynamics of blood borne viral epidemics and sexually transmissible infections. We welcome researchers, health professionals, policy-makers and community members from across a variety of fields to join us and engage with research and practice from a multi-disciplinary perspective.

Margins and Belonging

Stigmatised sexual and drug practices, and their associated infections and illnesses, produce specific forms of marginalisation for affected individuals and groups. But people in affected groups also forge a sense of belonging and community membership in a range of ways within broader society and within their affected communities. This conference aims to examine how social margins and belonging are produced and contested by a range of discourses and practices within medicine, the media, research, criminal law and law enforcement, political rhetoric, health policy and health promotion, harm reduction, peer movements and activisms, human rights frameworks and the subcultures of affected communities. The conference is intended to provide a space for different actors and stakeholders to bring together diverse points of view and interests, and thereby contribute to a broader understanding of how marginalisation and belonging are produced and played out.
 
We invite delegates to consider the following:

  • How do particular forms of marginalisation associated with sex and drugs affect people’s lived experiences? How do these forms of marginalisation contribute to stigma and discrimination, understandings of risk, and decisions around disclosure or treatment?
  • How is belonging forged by people on the margins, with other affected people and with the broader community? What meanings and practices do they use to gain or re-gain membership?
  • Can biomedicine and related technologies ‘demarginalise’ affected people? And if so how?
  • How are institutions like the law, medicine, government and media implicated in defining social membership for affected individuals and groups?
  • How is marginalisation and belonging created through health promotion, prevention and policy activities relating to HIV, viral hepatitis, sexuality and drug use?
  • How are research activities and their focus on particular communities implicated in reinforcing or challenging marginality and belonging among affected individuals and groups?


We also invite speakers to address other significant social research issues related to HIV, viral hepatitis, sexuality and drug use.